Day 112 – 366 Day Project

Day 112 – 366 Day Project

“Australian BrushTurkey”   Day 112 of 366 Day Project “Magic is everywhere, explore & be amazed everyday!” Spotted out on an afternoon stroll around the peninsula it’s not uncommon to come across what I call the ‘bush turkey’ foraging around the parks and bush land areas. They tend to mingle among the visitors in the local park and are usually friendly towards picnickers. The Australian brushturkey or Australian brush-turkey (Alectura lathami), also frequently called the scrub turkey or bush turkey, is a common, widespread species of mound-building bird found in eastern Australia from Far North Queensland to Illawarra in New South Wales. The Australian brushturkey has also been introduced to Kangaroo Island in South Australia. Despite its name and their superficial similarities, the bird is not closely related to American turkeys, or to the Australian bustard, which is also known as the bush turkey. It is a large bird with black feathers and a red head. Its total length is about 60–75 cm (23–30 in) and a wingspan of about 85 cm (33 in). It has a prominent, fan-like tail flattened sideways, and its plumage is mainly blackish, but with a bare red head, and a yellow. The male’s wattle becomes much larger during breeding season, often swinging from side to side as they run. The males’ heads and wattles also become much brighter during the breeding and nesting season. The underside of the body is sprinkled with white feathers, more pronounced in older birds. The brushturkey is a clumsy flier and cannot fly long distances, only taking to the air when threatened by predators or to roost in trees at night and...
Day 111 – 366 Day Project

Day 111 – 366 Day Project

“Bodyboarding”   Day 111 of 366 Day Project “Magic is everywhere, explore & be amazed everyday!”   On an early morning walk on the beach I spotted these two guys heading out to catch a wave or two.  I noticed that their boards were shorter than the standard surf board so did some research… So What is Bodyboarding? Bodyboarding is an awesome sport that can’t really be described. It’s a board sport very similar to stand up surfing, but in bodyboarding, the rider lies on his/her stomach or kneels on a smaller soft board. The board is more flexible and allows more radical changes in speed and more vertical drops. The true father of modern bodyboarding is Tom Morey who invented the “Morey Boogie Board”. This board was once the choice of mainly kids and beginning surfers, riders began to ride the Boogie Board for more advanced maneuvers in progressively gnarlier conditions until the term “boogie” was stricken from the language and replaced by the much less silly “bodyboard.” The basic bodyboard is a 3-4 foot foam rectangle, but modern boards are designed specifically for riders and wave type. Bodyboarders can ride either “prone” or in the “drop knee” position. In the prone position, body boarders can complete maneuvers of much more difficulty and in a much more critical area of the wave than stand up surfers. If you want to know the rush of riding a wave, grab a bodyboard and get out...
Day 108 – 366 Day Project

Day 108 – 366 Day Project

“Beacon”   Day 108 of 366 Day Project “Magic is everywhere, explore & be amazed everyday!”   Buoys and marks are like marine traffic signals, and they have particular meanings – warning of dangers, directing you to deep water and keeping you on the correct side of the channel. Direction of the buoyage: On entering a port or harbor, or travelling upsteam in a river or channel, you should pass the port (RED) mark on your port (LEFT) side and the starboard (GREEN) mark on your starboard (RIGHT) side. On leaving a port or harbour, or travelling downstream in a river or channel, you should pass the port (RED) mark on your starboard (RIGHT) side and the starboard (GREEN) mark on the port (LEFT) side. A simple rhyme that references navigation lights on your vessel and may help you to remember is: “Green to green when going upstream; green to red when seas are ahead.”...
Day 107 – 366 Day Project

Day 107 – 366 Day Project

“Vortex Water Feature”   Day 107 of 366 Day Project “Magic is everywhere, explore & be amazed everyday!”   At the Canberra Airport terminal heading home from my family trip, I noticed these amazing water features outside the main entry of the terminal. After I checked my luggage in I detoured back to take some photos. The need to provide physical protection to the front of the terminal building, the team at Canberra airport decided to design a more aesthetic alternative to traditional bollards. “Just as heart is a fountain of unspoken words, the universe is a womb of wonder weird worlds.” ― Toba Beta Waterforms International and GMB Architects worked together to find a solution that combined both clever landscaping and unique water features. Richard Phillips, Manager aviation Projects, Canberra airport explained, ‘the water wall along the road edge had always been part of the solution, but we wanted two signature pieces to mark the terminal entries and to finish the stone ‘triangle’. So the ‘vortexes’ were created. They are the work of Dirk Slotboom, Chris Carter and Mark Salis from Waterforms International. They are the only Vortexes of this size in Australia and feature coloured LeD lighting, which are controlled by a central computer and can, rotate through eight colours or stay as one. The vortex can grow and disappear altogether, and even change shape and give the effect of plaiting hair. On a more practical note, the water is re-circulated, filtered and treated to 1.5 microns to prevent any sort of bacteria and if anything falls into the vortex it can be retrieved from a collection...
Day 106 – 366 Day Project

Day 106 – 366 Day Project

“Shadows”   Day 106 of 366 Day Project “Magic is everywhere, explore & be amazed everyday!”   I know I’ve already posted a blog on shadows, Day 48 with Kodie my dog, but this one was magic and I thought worth sharing here. This was on our way home from the park when the sun was low. My three grandchildren were giggling and fascinated with the distorted effect of their shadows…so tall and skinny, no representation of them in real life.   Shadows—for all their subtlety—will add so much to any picture. They’re spectacular for highlighting emotions and generating some really surreal imagery. The best part about them may be the fact that they can be used in so many different ways. Versatility is always a very likeable quality!   “Never fear shadows. They simply mean there’s a light shining somewhere nearby.” ~ Ruth E.Renkel It all comes down to how a photographer approaches the concept of shadows in snapping pictures. Shadows aren’t simply black masses that border light; rather, they’re entities that are every bit just as alive as the light in a picture! There are many diverse ways that shadows could be incorporated into everyday photography. Photographers use focus, texture and, in some cases, even misdirection to highlight the power of shadows as a way of producing something aesthetically pleasing. Shadows can be used to obscure, as when they hide facial detail to draw the eye to a certain part of the face. They may also be used to display both texture and form, as when their presence highlights details in the terrain (such as ripples in...
Day 105 – 366 Day Project

Day 105 – 366 Day Project

“Trampoline FUN”   Day 105 of 366 Day Project “Magic is everywhere, explore & be amazed everyday!”   Did you know that trampolining is one of the most effective form of exercise? Well don’t’ know about you but I’m totally amazed. Apparently research has found, rebound exercise such as trampolining is ‘the most efficient, effective form of exercise yet devised by man’. In fact, studies found that 10 minutes of trampolining was a better workout than 30 minutes of running. Two of my granddaughters, Arya and Olivia were living proof during my recent family visit that trampolining can be so much fun. It was magical to watch them play, bounce, laugh, giggles…priceless moments! Here are some of the top benefits: Jumping can enhance motor skills and improved coordination and balance. Jumping is great for stress relief. Trampolining can improve behavior. It’s a great way for kids to expend their energy, which might otherwise result in more destructive behavior. Jumping can enhance motor skills. It is a great way of enhancing children’s muscle development, strengthening bones and reinforcing joints. Trampolining improves coordination and balance. Bouncing creates a constantly shifting centre of gravity, which kids must quickly respond to by adjusting their positions and bilateral movements. Jumping is great for stress relief. The motion of jumping up and down on a trampoline is fun and a great way to wind down after a difficult day in school. The concentration, fun and repetition of rebounding on a trampoline is great for advancing sensory skills. Trampolining can improve kids’ ability to learn. Through calming kids down and improving their concentration, trampolining can improve kids’...